The Carey Adventures http://thecareyadventures.com/blog EXPLORE - INSPIRE - EDUCATE Tue, 21 Apr 2015 18:07:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2 Photo Of The Day – The Tiny Photographer http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-the-tiny-photographer/ http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-the-tiny-photographer/#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 18:07:48 +0000 http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/?p=15736 Continue Reading →]]> Title: The Tiny Photographer

 

Location: Gokyo, Solukhumbu, Himalayas, Nepal, Aisa

Description: Against the sixth tallest mountain in the world, even a large lens can seem so small. 

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Photograph Copyright Peter West Carey. Image Available For Commercial Licensing (email).

Prints of this image are available here if you want professional quality shipped to your home.

You can copy, share and print this image as long as you tell people where it came from. Just don’t sell it, please.

Image may be reproduced for personal, non-commercial use (details) under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Non-Licensed Commercial use is prohibited. Attribution to this post or Peter West Carey Photography must be given, please.

 

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31+ Days Of Photography Experiments – Light Trails http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/31-days-of-photography-experiments-light-trails/ http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/31-days-of-photography-experiments-light-trails/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 22:29:02 +0000 http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/?p=15725 Continue Reading →]]> 31+ Days Of Photography Experiments LogoWandered here from somewhere else? Check out all the 31+ Days of Photography Experiments.

Today’s experiment is a fun one and I hope it gets you thinking of light differently, because there are a lot of things that can be done with this one.

Just to be clear, Light Trails, as I talk about them here, are different than what most call “light painting”. Light painting in my mind is shining a light on something to illuminate it in a particular was to gain a particular effect. It’s also a lot of fun in the dark. Light trails are capturing the light directly emmited from the source while light painting is usually concerned with light reflecting off of surfaces.

image

My fancy with light trails started with maybe my tenth roll of film about 25 years ago. I worked a swing shift and got home in the wee hours, around 3am. The streets were deserted then (fun fact: There were 5.2 billion people on the planet in 1990. In 2015 there are 7.2 billion. That could be part of the reason, 2 billion is a LOT less people driving the streets) and I took to some overpasses to play around with this technique. The idea was to record a set of taillights heading off into the distance.

And it’s quite easy with any subject you choose.

Here’s the experiment you can run:

image

  1. Wait until it is dark. Or find a large enough dark space if you’re impatient.
  2. Set your camera on a tripod or stead surface. The shutter is going to be open for a while so it has to be rock steady.
  3. Switch to Manual mode. Now set your aperture to f/8 as a starting point. ISO should be 200 or so. You can play around with these once you see the effect.
  4. You will want some moving lights. I suggest cars as they are predictable. Strapping a glowstick to your cat’s collar can also work (someone please do this and post the results). You can also walk around with sparklers or a small LED light. Or even a candle.
  5. “What about the shutter speed?” you say? That is going to depend on what you’re shooting. For starters, let’s go with 15 seconds and you will be able to adjust from there depending on how dark your scene is.
  6. Focus on a known element in the frame, like a lamp post or anything not moving. Manual focus works best.
  7. Release the hounds!! I suggest using your camera’s self-timer function (either in 2 second or 10 second mode….or better yet, use a remote control) to help you not wiggle the camera at the start.
  8. Once the shutter is open, move the light source (i.e. Give the cat catnip just before this point).

Done!

Your first attempt might be odd. But hopefully this gets you thinking. If you ever used sparklers on the 4th of July (or your country’s firework blowing-up holiday) you know what to do next. You can write words, trace outlines or just go crazy.

Are your lines took dark? What do you think you should change to make them lighter (there is more than one right answer)? Is the scene too bright and you can’t see the trails? What should change?

For more info on this technique and some examples, check out my post in 31+ Days To Better Photography.

Please post your attempts in the comments section below, either directly or as links. I’d love to see them (especially the cat-glowstick ones).

Here’s a sample from a few summers ago.

 

31+ Days Of Photography Experiments is a series written by professional photographer Peter West Carey on The Carey Adventures.Com. The series is designed to unravel the mysteries of photography so you can take better pictures through practical experiments on the material found in 31+ Days To Better Photography. Subscribe here to receive all the updates and bonus material. Your comments are always welcome.

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Photo Of The Day – Monk Debates or That One Monk Who Was Being A Jerk http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-monk-debates-or-that-one-monk-who-was-being-a-jerk/ http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-monk-debates-or-that-one-monk-who-was-being-a-jerk/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 15:25:51 +0000 http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/?p=15719 Continue Reading →]]> Title: Monk Debates

 

Location: Jakar, Bumthang Valley, Bhutan, Asia

Description: On my first visit to Bhutan we were lucky enough to have time at a local monastery in Jakar, near the center of the country, to witness an afternoon of Buddhist monk debates. I couldn’t understand a word that was being said but the intent was obvious and our local guide filled in the rest.

The monks will take turns sitting and standing. When seated they can be approached by any other monk and a debate ensues. We were told one reason for the debate is to find a way to argue both sides of the subject without becoming attached to that side. Argueing for argument’s sake, in a sense. It’s a way to practice the concept of non-attachment that is important in Buddhist studies.

The way it played out was something different. It was clear who the older and more experienced monks were as they tended to be more boisterous. Such was the case with the gentleman you see seated.

He had been doing his share of standing and spouting his opinion on various Buddhist philosophies and philisophical questions. The monks use a clapping motion and tend to lord it over the seated as a means of intimidation. Further, they will swing their mala (a sort of rosary) over the head of the seated opponent when they feel they have made a particualrly winning point.

Here you can see our antagonist, seated, taking his medicine. But the debates don’t usually end with this.

 

Our anti-hero is up in a seated position and dosing it out. The irony is he was standing just minutes earlier, arguing the opposite point of view just as fervently. Again, not speaking the language I didn’t know what they were arguing but some basic knowledge of human nature told me this guy was dishing it out just to dish it out.

He was nearly toppled again as his attackers loomed over him, pushed back on one arm. But as he recovered I caught this image:

 

…which told me this guy was full of it and having a good time with the others.  

These debates are not posted on some grand tour schedule. You’ll have to have your guide (everyone entering Bhutan is required to hire a guide, except some people from India and SE Asia) ask around to see if any are happening. In this case it was just me and the three guests I had on my photo tour. Two other tourists left after about 20 minutes. 

I guess watching people argue in other languages is not for everyone. For me, it was a lot of fun and something I would do again.

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The Carey Adventures’ Cleaner Design, Come Take A Look! http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/the-carey-adventures-cleaner-design-come-take-a-look/ http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/the-carey-adventures-cleaner-design-come-take-a-look/#comments Thu, 16 Apr 2015 06:05:56 +0000 http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/?p=15709 Continue Reading →]]> RedesignIf you’re reading this in an email or RSS reader, take a moment to pop on over to The Carey Adventures.com in your web browser. 

I’ve spent the last 24 hours almost exclusively on my computer first breaking and then improving the site in a number of ways.

First, it should look cleaner and have one of those fancy slider things with pretty pictures that respond to your screen’s width.

Second, it should render well on any screen size. And even render differently when you rotate your tablet or phone, depending on size.

Third, I hope it is easier to navigate and find what you’re looking for.

Fourth, no more partial featured image above the main post, which always bugged me! Plus I did away with the background image. The Photo Of The Day should come through cleaner when viewed on the site (here’s an example of the new format for posts).

I have some small tweaks to finish, like making the individual posts be easier to click instead of having to hit the little link icon. And adding a nicer header from my own images.

Now to get back to adding great content more regularly.

Let me know what you think of the redesign and if there are any adjustments you think would help.

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Photo Of The Day – Trekking In Nepal http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-trekking-in-nepal/ http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-trekking-in-nepal/#comments Fri, 10 Apr 2015 19:05:44 +0000 http://thecareyadventures.com/blog/?p=15675 Continue Reading →]]> Title: Trekking in Nepal

Peter-West-Carey-Nepal2011-1007-9670

Location:  Solukhumbu, Nepal, Asia

Description: Two porters carry a load up toward the base camp for Mount Everest (not pictured) in the Khumbu region of Nepal.

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Camera Canon 7D
Lens Canon 28-300mm L
ISO 100
Focal Length 85mm
Aperture f/5
Shutter Speed 1/1000
Altitude unknown

Photograph Copyright Peter West Carey. Image Available For Commercial Licensing (email).

Prints of this image are available here if you want professional quality shipped to your home.

You can copy, share and print this image as long as you tell people where it came from. Just don’t sell it, please.

Image may be reproduced for personal, non-commercial use (details) under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Non-Licensed Commercial use is prohibited. Attribution to this post or Peter West Carey Photography must be given, please.

 

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